Sindarin 

lang

noun. cutlass, sword

Sindarin [Ety/367, X/LH] Group: SINDICT. Published by

lang

noun. a passage

n. a passage (physical). Originally applied to any route or connecting link between two places or large objects, esp. such as enable one to cross or surmount an obstacle: such as mountain-pass, a ridge of higher land across fen-land, an isthmus, etc. Later applied to narrower parts of a structure serving to join larger parts, esp. the 'neck' of men and animals. FAchad Tarlang

Sindarin [(PE17 Sindarin Corpus) PE17:91-2] < *_langō_ < LAƷA cross, pass over, go beyond. Group: Parma Eldalamberon 17 Sindarin Corpus. Published by

lang

noun. passage; neck, passage; neck, *throat

A word for “neck” appearing in notes written around 1967, most notably as an element in tarlang “stiff-neck” = “proud” (PE17/92). It was derived from primitive ✶langō (< √LAƷA “cross, pass over, go beyond”) which meant “a passage (physical), originally applied to any route or connecting link between two places or large objects, especially such as enabled one to cross or surmount an obstacle: such as a mountain-pass, a ridge of higher land across fen-land, an isthmus etc.” (PE17/91-92). This word was then “later applied to narrower parts of a structure serving to join larger parts, especially the ‘neck’ of men and animals”. The word lang had the gloss “neck” (both in geography as well as for men and animals) in Tolkien’s Nomenclature of the Lord of the Rings as well (RC/536).

Conceptual Development: There was a similar noun N. {lhang >>} lhanc in The Etymologies of the 1930s derived from the root ᴹ√LAK “swallow” (Ety/LANK). This earlier word was likewise an element in N. tarlanc “stiff-necked, obstinate” (Ety/TÁRAG).

Neo-Sindarin: For purposes of Neo-Sindarin, I think it is unlikely that N. lhanc (or ᴺS. ✱lanc) “throat” can coexist with S. lang “neck”. However, since S. lang originally referred to a “passage”, I think it can be interpreted as referring to the passage from the mouth to the stomach and lungs, and hence also used with the sense “✱throat”. For the actual interior mechanism of the throat, however, I’d recommend the neologism ᴺS. lhunc “pharynx, gullet” < ᴹ√SLUK “swallow”.

Cognates

  • Q. lango “neck, neck, [ᴹQ.] throat” ✧ PE17/092

Derivations

  • langō “route or connection between to places; neck” ✧ PE17/092
    • LAƷ “cross, pass over, go beyond” ✧ PE17/091

Element in

  • ᴺS. langan(d) “stringed instrument with a neck (lute, guitar, etc.)”
  • S. Tarlang “Stiff Neck; Stiff/Tough Passage” ✧ RC/536
  • S. tarlang “proud, (lit.) stiff-necked; stiff neck (a nickname applied to men of haughty carriage or mood); the stiff/tough passage, proud, [N.] obstinate, [S.] (lit.) stiff-necked; stiff neck (a nickname applied to men of haughty carriage or mood); the stiff/tough passage” ✧ PE17/092; RC/536; RC/536

Phonetic Developments

DevelopmentStagesSources
langō > lang[laŋgō] > [laŋgo] > [laŋg] > [laŋ]✧ PE17/092
Sindarin [PE17/092; RC/536] Group: Eldamo. Published by

lang

cutlass

lang (sword), pl. laing

lang

noun. cutlass, sword

Sindarin Group: Eldamo - fan adaptations. Published by

tuilinn

swallow

(etymologically ”spring-singer”) *tuilinn (i duilinn, o thuilinn), no distinct pl. form except with article (i thuilinn). Form normalized from tuilind in source; the latter would be an archaic form.

athra

cross

(verb) #athra- (isolated from the gerund athrad "crossing") (i athra, in athrar), also athrada- (traverse) (i athrada, in athradar)