Sindarin 

caun

noun. valour
Sindarin Group: Eldamo. Published by

caun

prince

pl1. cónin {ō} n. prince, chief, head.

Sindarin [(PE17 Sindarin Corpus) PE17:102] -. Group: Parma Eldalamberon 17 Sindarin Corpus. Published by

caun

noun. outcry, clamor
Sindarin [PM/361-362] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

caun

noun. prince, ruler
Sindarin [LotR/VI:IV, Letters/308] MS *kaun, Q. cáno. Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

caun²

noun. outcry, clamour
Sindarin [PM/362] Group: Eldamo. Published by

caun¹

noun. prince, chief, head

The third-age Sindarin word for “prince” (PE17/102), appearing in its plural form conin in the Praises of Cormallen: Daur a Berhael, Conin en Annûn “Frodo and Sam, princes of the west” (LotR/953; Let/448). More generally, caun means “chief” or “head”, and appears as an element in the word condir “mayor, (lit.) chief-man” (SD/129). There is another more archaic Sindarin word for “prince”, †cund, which appears in some old names from Beleriand: Baragund, Belegund and (possibly) Felagund*.

Possible Etymology: The etymology of caun “prince” is unclear. David Salo suggested (GS/245) that it is derived from ✶kānō “leader, commander” (originally “crier, herald”). This primitive word also appears as an element in the Quenya names of the sons of Fingolfin: Q. Findecáno (S. Fingon) and Q. Turucáno (S. Turgon). However, caun might instead be derived from an a-fortified form of the root √KUN(DU) “lord; to lead”, so that: ✶kun- > ✶kaun- > S. caun. This second derivation would make S. caun a cognate of Q. cundo “prince”.

Given the uncertain status of √KUN in later writings, a derivation from ✶kānō might be preferable. However, Tolkien stated than in Sindarin, the derivatives of √KAN were used for “cry out, shout, call” but not “order, command” (PM/361). If the Sindarin derivatives of √KAN had nothing to do with leadership, perhaps the archaic word †cund “prince” was altered to caun under the influence of Q. cáno and names like S. Fingon and Turgon, and that is the origin of the modern Sindarin word.

Grammar: This word has an irregular plural: conin “princes” (LotR/953; Let/448). For other words such as êl “star”, such a plural indicates the preservation of ancient priminite n, lost at the end of the singular form. This seems unlikely to be the case here, so likely this irregular plural is by analogy with other plural words.

Sindarin [Let/448; LotR/0953; PE17/102] Group: Eldamo. Published by

can-

verb. to cry out, shout, call
Sindarin [PM/361-362] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

cund

noun. prince

This word is only directly attested in the Etymologies, appearing as N. †cunn “prince” (Ety/KUNDŪ) and marked as an archaic form (EtyAC/KUNDŪ). It still appears in later writings as a element in some first-age Sindarin names from The Silmarillion: Baragund, Belegund and (perhaps) Felagund. Its Quenya cognate Q. cundo also appears in later writings (PM/260, PE17/117-8), indicating that †cund may have remained conceptually valid. Elsewhere, the third-age Sindarin word for “prince” is said to be caun¹ (PE17/102), so it seems likely the older form †cund fell out use.

Sindarin Group: Eldamo. Published by

cund

noun. prince
Sindarin [Ety/366, VT/45:24, X/ND1] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

gorn

noun. valor
Sindarin [Aragorn PM/xii] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

ernil

noun. prince
Sindarin [LotR/VI:IV, Letters/308, UT/428, RGEO/75] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

ernil

noun. prince
Sindarin [Let/425; LotR/0768; LotR/0807; UT/245] Group: Eldamo. Published by

nallon

verb. I cry
Sindarin [LotR/IV:X, RGEO/72, Letters/278] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

nalla-

verb. to cry
Sindarin [nallon LotR/IV:X, RGEO/72, Letters/278] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

* lost

adjective. empty
Sindarin [S/184] Group: Eldamo. Published by

lost

adjective. empty
Sindarin [Ety/370, X/LH] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

* lost

empty

lost (pl. lyst), also cofn (void), lenited gofn, pl. cyfn

* caun

outcry

caun (i gaun, o chaun) (clamour, cry, shout), pl. coen (i choen), coll. pl. conath, the latter used = "lamentation" (PM:345, 362). Note: a homophone of caun means "valour".

* caun

clamour

caun (i gaun, o chaun) (outcry, cry, shout), pl. coen (i choen), coll. pl. conath, the latter often used = "lamentation" (PM:345, 362). Note: a homophone of caun means "valour".

* caun

cry

(noun) caun (i gaun, o chaun) (clamour, outcry, shout), pl. coen (i choen), coll. pl. conath, the latter often used = "lamentation" (PM:345, 362). Note: a homophone of caun means "valour".

* caun

shout

(noun) caun (i gaun, o chaun) (clamour, outcry, cry), pl. coen (i choen), coll. pl. conath, the latter is used = "lamentation" (PM:345, 362). Note: a homophone of caun means "valour".

* can

shout

can- (i gân, i chenir) (cry out, call). Adj.

* cund

noun. prince

This word is only directly attested in The Etymologies, appearing as N. †cunn “prince” (Ety/KUNDŪ) and marked as an archaic form (EtyAC/KUNDŪ). It still appears in later writings as a element in some first-age Sindarin names from The Silmarillion: Baragund, Belegund and (perhaps) Felagund. Its Quenya cognate Q. cundo also appears in later writings (PM/260, PE17/117-8), indicating that †cund may have remained conceptually valid. Elsewhere, the third-age Sindarin word for “prince” is said to be caun (PE17/102), so it seems likely the older form †cund fell out use.

Sindarin Group: Neologism. Published by

* cûn

bowed

cûn (bowshaped, bent), lenited gûn; pl. cuin

* covn

noun. empty, void
Sindarin Group: Neologism. Published by

* gorn

valour

1) #gorn (i **orn), pl. gyrn (i ngyrn = i ñyrn). Isolated from the name Aragorn, ”Kingly Valour” (PM:xii). Note: a homophone is the adjective ”hasty, vigorous, impetuous”. 2) caun (i gaun, o chaun), pl. coen (i choen) if there is a pl. Note: a homophone of caun** means "clamour, outcry, cry, shout".

* thalas

noun. valour, courage
Sindarin Group: Neologism. Published by

* ernil

prince

1) ernil (no distinct pl. form), 2) †cund (i gund, o chund, construct cun), pl. cynd (i chynd) (VT45:24). 3) The plural form conin (i chonin), occurring in the Cormallen Praise, is translated "princes" (Conin en Annûn = "princes of the west", Letters:308), but it is unclear what the singular would be. (David Salo suggests caun, though this word has two different meanings already; see SHOUT, VALOUR)