Quenya 

túrin

noun. lord
Quenya [PBL/1.02] Group: Eldamo. Published by

heru

noun. lord, lord, master
Quenya [DTS/54.01; Let/282.1802; Let/282.1803; PE17/097.4213; PM/210.2202; PM/210.2203; SA/heru.001; SA/roch.022; VT41/09.2402; VT43/29.0802; VT44/12.3501] Group: Eldamo. Published by

heru

lord, master

heru (also hér) noun "lord, master" (PM:210, KHER, LT1:272, VT44:12); Letters:283 gives hér (heru); the form Héru with a long vowel refers to God in the source where it appears (i Héru "the Lord", VT43:29). In names like Herumor "Black Lord" and Herunúmen "Lord of the West" (SA:heru). The form heruion is evidently a gen.pl. of heru "lord": "of the lords" (SD:290); herunúmen "Lord-of-West" (LR:47), title of Manwë. Pl. númeheruvi "Lords-of-West" (*"West-lords") in SD:246, a title of the Valar; does this form suggest that #heruvi is the regular plural of heru?

mandu

noun. lord
Quenya Group: Eldamo. Published by

Malantur

lord, ruler

Malantur, masc. name. Apparently includes -(n)tur "lord, ruler". The initial element is unlikely to connect with the early "Qenya" element mala- "hurt, pain", and may rather reflect the root MALAT "gold" (PM:366): Malat-ntur > Malantur "Gold-ruler"? (UT:210)

condo

noun. lord
Quenya Group: Eldamo. Published by

hér

lord

hér noun "lord" (VT41:9), also heru, q.v.

hér

noun. lord
Quenya Group: Eldamo. Published by

* herunauco

9V7J5.DaH noun. dwarf-lord, dwarven lord
Quenya [Compound of heru and nauco] Group: Neologism. Published by

Sindarin 

brannon

noun. lord
Sindarin Group: Eldamo. Published by

hîr

noun. lord, lord, master
Sindarin [LB/354.3102; Let/282.1702; Let/382.2711; PM/210.2402; SA/heru.007; SD/129.0103; UT/318.3808; VT41/09.2405; VT41/09.2805] Group: Eldamo. Published by

* hîr

lord

1) hîr (i chîr, o chîr; also hir-, her- at the beginning of compounds) (master), no distinct pl. form, not even with article (i chîr), coll. pl. híriath (Letters:282, 386; VT41:9); 2) heron (i cheron, o cheron) (master), pl. heryn (i cheryn), coll. pl. heronnath (VT45:22)._ _Since the pl. heryn clashes with the fem. sg. heryn ”lady”, other words for ”lord” may be preferred. 3) brannon (i vrannon), pl. brennyn (i mrennyn), coll. pl. brannonnath; 4) tûr (i dûr, o thûr, construct tur) (mastery, power, control; master, victor), pl. tuir (i thuir), coll. pl. túrath.

Adûnaic

arûn

masculine name. Lord

An Adûnaic name for Morgoth, perhaps coined by Sauron when he introduced the worship of the dark god to the Númenóreans, translated as “Lord” (SD/376). It is derived from the word ârû “king” and was sometimes used in a compound together with Morgoth’s true Adûnaic name: Arûn-Mulkhêr (SD/367). In other writings (SD/357) it was the original Adûnaic name of Morgoth before he fell to evil, but that hardly makes sense in the conceptual scenario of the later Silmarillion, in which Morgoth had already become evil before men awoke.

Adûnaic [SD/357.3603; SD/376.3314; SDI2/Arûn.001] Group: Eldamo. Published by

kherû

masculine name. Lord

A rejected draft version of the Adûnaic name for Morgoth translated “Lord”, replaced by Arûn of the same meaning (SD/376). It is transparently a derivative of the Elvish root ᴹ√KHER, as suggested by Carl Hostetter and Patrick Wynn (AAD/18). A later form of this word, *khôr “lord”, may appears as an element in the name Adûnakhôr “Lord of the West”.

Adûnaic [SD/376.3406; SDI2/Arûn.009] Group: Eldamo. Published by

* khôr

noun. lord

An element meaning “lord” appearing only in the name Adûnakhôr “Lord of the West”, though a similar form appears in the earlier names Kherû “Lord” and Mulkhêr “Lord of Darkness”. It isn’t clear whether this element is akhôr or khôr, but khôr resembles the Primitive Elvish root √KHER “rule, govern, possess”, to which it may be related.

This possible relationship has been suggested by various authors (AL/Adûnaic, EotAL/KHUR). Andreas Moehn rejected the relationship, pointing out that Primitive Elvish ✶khēru “lord” would have developed phonetically into Ad. **khîru (EotAL). However, khôr may be derived from some more ancient Avari loan word, which underwent different phonetic developments than those of the Eldarin languages, perhaps ✶kher- > khar > khaur > Ad. khôr.

Adûnaic Group: Eldamo. Published by

Khuzdûl

uzbad

noun. lord
Khuzdûl [PE17/047.2102] Group: Eldamo. Published by

Noldorin 

hîr

noun. lord, master, master, lord
Noldorin [Ety/KHER.019; EtyAC/KHER.017; TI/249.2403] Group: Eldamo. Published by

brannon

noun. lord
Noldorin [Ety/BARÁD.049] Group: Eldamo. Published by

brannon

noun. lord
Noldorin [Ety/351] Group: Hiswelókë's Sindarin Dictionary. Published by

Beware, older languages below! The languages below were invented during Tolkien's earlier period and should be used with caution. Remember to never, ever mix words from different languages!

Primitive elvish

kun

root. lord, to lead

This root appears the Etymologies in the extended form ᴹ√KUNDU, from which ᴹQ. †kundu, N. †cunn “prince” and N. Felagund “Lord of Caves” were derived. In later writings (PE17/113, 117), Tolkien explored the possibility of connecting Felagund to the names of Fingon and Turgon, deriving all three from a primitive form ✶kondō (<< ✶kundō) and using a new form of this root: √KON (<< √KUN). He even went so far as to change the first of these names to Felegond with an “o” (PE17/118).

However, in still later writings (PM/345), Tolkien established that the element -gon “lord” in S. Fingon and Turgon was ultimately derived from Q. cáno “commander”. In the same text, he revised the etymology of S. Felagund so that it was derived from a Khuzdul name Kh. Felakgundu “Cave-hewer” (PM/352), as described in The Silmarillion index (SI/Felagund). These revisions make it likely that Tolkien abandoned the form √KON.

The later status of earlier √KUN is unclear, however. √KUN might have been rejected along with √KON, or Tolkien may have restored it. As evidence of its restoration, †cund remained as an element in two older (Sindarin?) names: Baragund and Belegund. Furthermore, its Quenya derivative Q. cundo appears as an element in the later name Q. Carma-cundo, albiet with a new gloss “guardian”.

If we accept the restoration of √KUN, its Quenya derivative cundo “prince, lord, guardian” could be considered valid, possibly along with the verb cunya- “to rule”. Its Sindarin derivative †cund “prince” should probably be considered archaic, however, replaced by the time of the Third Age with caun¹.

Primitive elvish [PE17/113.1503; PE17/113.2704; PE17/158.1101] Group: Eldamo. Published by

kundō

noun. lord, prince, leader, lord
Primitive elvish [PE17/113.2701; PE17/117.4104] Group: Eldamo. Published by

árātō

noun. lord
Primitive elvish [PE17/118.4607] Group: Eldamo. Published by

kon

root. lord, to lead
Primitive elvish Group: Eldamo. Published by

Qenya 

heru

noun. lord
Qenya [GL/49.2707; LT1A/Valahíru.030; PME/040.3704; QL/040.2401] Group: Eldamo. Published by

mandu

noun. lord
Qenya [PE21/15.0507] Group: Eldamo. Published by

malko

noun. lord, lord, sir
Qenya [PME/062.1601; QL/062.0801; QL/062.0802] Group: Eldamo. Published by

Doriathrin

garon

noun. lord

A Doriathrin noun for “lord” derived from the root ᴹ√ƷAR or possibly ᴹ√GAR (Ety/ƷAR), perhaps from a primitive form *✶ɣarān-. If so, the initial [ɣ] became [g], while the long [ā] became [ō] and then shortened to [o] in the final syllable of a polysyllable.

Conceptual Development: An earlier version of this entry had Dor. garan, which likely had a short [a] in the second syllable which was preserved. Since it did not undergo the Ilkorin Syncope, the primitive form likely either had no final vowel or ended in a short [a], so the second [a] was in the final syllable, which seems to have prevented the syncope; this theory is supported by its Quenya cognate ᴹQ. haran.

Doriathrin [Ety/ƷAR.058; EtyAC/ƷAR.054; EtyAC/ƷARA.027] Group: Eldamo. Published by

Gnomish

túrin

masculine name. Lord
Gnomish [LBI/Túrin.001; LT2I/Túrin.001; PE15/61.0601] Group: Eldamo. Published by

hermon

noun. lord
Gnomish [GL/49.4201] Group: Eldamo. Published by

malc

noun. lord
Gnomish [GL/56.3301] Group: Eldamo. Published by

Early Noldorin

hîr

noun. lord
Early Noldorin [PE13/121.0801; PE13/121.0803; PE13/121.0805; PE13/121.0807; PE13/121.2407; PE13/121.2409; PE13/147.5901] Group: Eldamo. Published by